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Deep-Fried Eggs with Sriracha Remoulade

Deep-Fried Eggs with Sriracha Remoulade


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Ingredients

Sriracha Remoulade

  • 2 1/2 tablespoons Sherry wine vinegar
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons sriracha sauce*
  • 1 tablespoon whole grain Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon chopped cornichons** or pickles
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons chopped fresh tarragon
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons chopped fresh chives
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons chopped drained capers
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 large hard-boiled eggs, chopped

Deep-Fried Eggs

  • 9 large eggs, room temperature
  • 2 tablespoons sriracha sauce
  • 1/2 cup all purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup semolina flour (pasta flour)***
  • 1 cup panko (Japanese breadcrumbs)
  • 1 teaspoon coarse kosher salt
  • Peanut oil or rice bran oil (for frying)
  • Dandelion greens (for garnish)

Recipe Preparation

Sriracha remoulade

  • Whisk first 10 ingredients in medium bowl. Stir in eggs.

Deep-fried eggs

  • Gently lower 6 eggs into large saucepan of boiling water, reduce heat to medium, and simmer 6 minutes for soft-boiled eggs. Drain. Cover eggs with cold water and cool. Very gently crack and peel eggs.

  • Whisk remaining 3 eggs, buttermilk, and sriracha in medium bowl. Whisk both flours in another medium bowl. Mix panko and coarse salt in another medium bowl. Working with 1 soft-boiled egg at a time, gently roll in flour mixture, then egg mixture, then panko mixture. Place on rimmed baking sheet.

  • Preheat oven to 325°F. Pour enough oil into large saucepan to reach depth of 2 inches. Attach deep-fry thermometer to side of pan. Heat oil to 375°F. Working in 2 batches, fry eggs until brown, turning occasionally, about 2 minutes. Using slotted spoon, transfer fried eggs to ovenproof plate and place in oven 3 minutes to heat through.

  • Spoon 1/4 cup remoulade into center of each of 6 plates; top each with 1 egg. Garnish with dandelion greens.

Nutritional Content

One serving contains the following: Calories (kcal) 465.3 %Calories from Fat 58.3 Fat (g) 30.2 Saturated Fat (g) 5.7 Cholesterol (mg) 431.1 Carbohydrates (g) 29.6 Dietary Fiber (g) 1.2 Total Sugars (g) 4.6 Net Carbs (g) 28.3 Protein (g) 16.9Reviews Section

Linton Hopkin's Buttermilk Fried Oysters with Remoulade

Remoulade
1 cup mayonnaise
1/2 cup Creole mustard
2 tablespoons hot sauce
1 tablespoon honey
1 teaspoon garlic, finely chopped
1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/2 teaspoon filé powder
1/4 scallion, minced

Oysters
2 1/3 cups cornmeal
2 1/3 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon Creole seasoning
1 teaspoon kosher salt
2 cups (20 to 20) shucked Southern oysters, stored in their own liquor
2 cups buttermilk
Peanut oil, for frying

To make the remoulade: In a medium bowl bowl, whisk together all ingredients. Transfer to a storage container, cover and refrigerate, in needed, for up to one week.

To make the oysters: Line a large plate with wax or parchment paper.

In a large bowl, whisk together the cornmeal, flour, Creole seasoning and salt.

Drain the oysters and combine with the buttermilk in a large bowl. Toss to coat.

One at a time, remove the oysters from the buttermilk, letting any excess drip off, and toss in the flour mixture to coat. Press on the flour mixture to make sure it adheres to the oysters. Transfer the oysters to the prepared plate.

Heat 2 inches of peanut oil to 375 degrees over medium-high heat in a large, heavy-bottomed pot. Alternatively, heat peanut oil to 375 degrees in a deep fryer following the manufacturer’s directions. Line a large plate with a brown paper bag.

Fry the oysters in batches of six until golden brown and just cooked through, about 90 seconds. The oysters will curl slightly when done. With a slotted spoon, transfer the oysters to the paper bag-lined plate. Repeat with the remaining oysters.

Serve the oysters hot with the remoulade.


What is Horseradish?

Horseradish is a condiment that can be found in many forms including grated, powder or pickled and is used to make a number of sauces and dressings. Horseradish grows underground and is a close relative of mustard and wasabi.

The root is the part of the plant most commonly harvested but the leaves can be sauced or used in salads.

The Horseradish plant comes from Russia and hungry and is even referenced in greek mythology as well as Shakespeare. If you want to learn more fun facts about horseradish checkout this article from Spruce Eats.


Recipe Story

This History of the Dish:

Fried pickles burst onto the food scene in the early 1960s, ready to take their rightful place in the culinary world. After the first printed recipe in the Oakland Tribune in 1962, this southern favorite spread like wildfire throughout the country. Over 50 years later, deep-fried pickle slices can be found at state fairs, food festivals, drive-ins, local restaurants, and homes alike. A versatile appetizer or side, this homemade fried pickles recipe pairs perfectly with a creamy Cajun dipping sauce made with the subtle, tangy taste of Duke’s Mayonnaise.

Crunchy Fried Pickles:

Once you’ve whipped up your zesty fried pickle sauce, it’s time for the main event: the crispy, salty fried pickle slices. Herbaceous Italian seasoning and spicy cayenne pepper give the savory, crunchy breaded exterior a depth of flavor that complements the juicy pickle slice.

Creamy Cajun Dipping Sauce:

With only three ingredients, this fried pickle dipping sauce is quick and easy to make at home. Combine ketchup, Duke’s Mayonnaise, and Cajun seasoning for a sweet yet spicy dipping sauce that pairs perfectly with fried favorites like this fried pickles recipe.

How to Serve:

Because of its popularity and versatility, many unique fried pickle recipes and serving styles have developed throughout the years. Dish up these fried pickle disks as a delicious accompaniment to Duke’s Amazing Glaze Grilled Salmon, as a side paired with Duke’s Juicy Burgers, or eat them as a summer snack. If Cajun isn’t your style, the fried pickles also taste great dipped in Duke’s Loaded Onion Dip.


Ingredient – A Quick Shout-Out to Semolina

A few months ago, when I was about to move to New York, I decided to clean out my parents’ pantry of all the things that had been sitting on the shelves for years (not hyperbole) and would most likely be doomed to sit there for many more. I snatched some canned jellies, pickles, pastes, pates, spices, curds, and pastas, knowing they would never be missed. I’ve been slowly working my way through my parents’ pantry here in Brooklyn, and I’m often grateful for that swiped can of anchovies (sorry, mom, I know you would have probably used those) or am inspired by a bag of chocolate pasta I wouldn’t have gone out of my way to buy. Sometimes the food has been sitting around so long it’s already stale – I’ve eaten some disappointing packets of oatmeal, slurped stale Ramen soup, and given away old-tasting pretzels to my less discerning roommates. But so far, the best find from the pantry has been semolina flour.

I had never eaten semolina flour before yesterday. My roommate and I had gone to a kegger in Williamsburg with free Kombucha and free Sixpoint beer, and by the time we left we were feeling hungry and tired after long days. In the mood for a movie and comfort food. I remembered a recipe from last month’s Bon Appétit that I had wanted to try – deep fried eggs with sriracha remoulade, which sounded like the bastion of comfort food: warm, soft-boiled eggs, mayonnaise, spice, pickles, and fried goodness. So I picked up a six-pack of Sierra Nevada at the corner Bodega and made small talk with the owner, who was feeling glum about spending his Friday night stuck under fluorescent lights.

Back at the apartment, I found my neighbor on the couch and told her she was going to have to stay for deep fried eggs even though she had work to do. So we put on Whitney Houston’s “I Wanna Dace With Somebody,” which is perfect comfort food-making music, and set about whipping up a remoulade and boiling eggs.

I’ve almost forgotten that I’m supposed to be telling you about how great semolina is. Here’s where it figures in this story: our soft boiled eggs were first rolled in a mixture of white flour and semolina flour, dunked in a blend of buttermilk, egg, and sriracha, and then covered with panko and salt.

Almost everything I’ve ever tried to deep fry has ended up tasting embarrassing, but last night it was as if deep-fry gods had smiled upon the Whitney and the Sierra Nevada and the good company. The eggs were perfect – light brown, crunchy fried crust, which, when cracked open hissed out steam and molten yolk.

Comfort food brought to you by semolina (and eggs and sriracha and mayonnaise and fried goodness). But anyway – that’s not how I really discovered the goodness of semolina. That’s just why I happened to open the bag.

Today, as I was cleaning up the kitchen, something which clearly didn’t happen last night, I saw a recipe on the back of the semolina for breakfast porridge, which involved emptying the whole pack in two liters of boiling water. Not so practical. But, using my cook’s intuition, I figured the standard two parts water to one part grain ratio would work relatively well. So as I made my morning cappuccino, I set a pot of water to boil, and when it was bubbling, added the semolina flour. Which, contrary to the instructions on the package (five minutes), cooked in about five seconds. The ratio was a little off – semolina requires about an extra ¼ – ½ cup of water, but I managed to smooth out most of the lumps. The result, plus milk, butter, and brown sugar, was a creamy, sweet porridge that was truly comforting to eat. Sort of like a cream of wheat that tastes more of mornings in the country and less of old people.

And to wrap up the whole semolina story, for lunch I threw the leftover cooked semolina (I couldn’t eat it all in porridge), in a skillet with green onions and mushrooms, and topped it with a fried egg and shavings of grated Sicilian black pepper cheese. Delicious.

So semolina, the grain I tried for the first time yesterday, has featured in my last three meals in three very different ways. From creamy to crunchy, to crisped – this versatile staple might just be my new comfort food.


Eat Me. Drink Me.

Josh, you have inspired me to bake. Well, Josh, it’s a toss-up between you and the barely used carton of buttermilk in the fridge. (Remember those deep-fried eggs?…) I feel like buttermilk often has this effect on people.

This project was miraculous for two reasons. One: I don’t bake. And two: I did my dirty dishes right after cooking. As for the first reason, I simply find that my temperament is not suited to baking. Baking is too mathematical, precise, and often unforgiving. I don’t even own a set of measuring spoons. And I cook very much by trial and error. And I am extremely bad at reading recipes. As for the second, that is probably truly the miracle.

My friend Brittany (or rather, Brittany’s mom) used to make these buttermilk cookies around Christmas time (I think – it was back in high school), and they were the best cookies ever. I finally asked for the recipe when we were about to graduate, then managed to make them – never. Lucky for me and the buttermilk in the fridge, I had just been looking through my recipe collection and had just those cookies in the back of my mind.

As with the measuring spoons, I don’t own a handheld mixer. So I creamed butter, eggs, and sugar by hand. Josh, here you were again inspiring.

I discovered, after I got this far, that I didn’t have any flour. So, leaving my pre-pubescent dough on the counter, I threw on a coat and some boots over my pajamas and ran to Bravo to pick up supplies so I could finish baking.

Back to work with flour and buttermilk, at which point the dough began to take on a sour twang that cut nicely through the sugar. I slipped little teaspoons of dough onto my baking stone and let the oven work its magic.

Meanwhile, I tried to decipher the icing instructions, which called for a box of 10x sugar (if this is a sugar brand, it is beyond me to know it) and an unspecified amount of an unspecified milk. So I made up an icing recipe. Which I think was a success.

When the cookies, like little muffin tops, came out of the oven, I drizzled them with my cream cheese and buttermilk icing and ate them hot.

Buttermilk Cookies

For the cookies:
1 cup sugar
2 sticks butter
3 eggs
3 ½ cups flour
1 tsp baking soda
½ tsp baking powder
1 cup buttermilk

Cream sugar, butter, and eggs, then add flour baking soda and baking powder. Mix well. Slowly add buttermilk. Drop by teaspoonful and bake at 350 for 10 minutes.

For the icing:
Keep in mind that I kind of made this up – so feel free to mess around with proportions.
1 ½ cups powdered sugar
1 stick butter
3 oz. cream cheese
1 tsp vanilla
1/3 cup buttermilk

Mix all ingredients except buttermilk until smooth. Add buttermilk until icing reaches desired consistency.

February 23, 2010

The Simple Life (Sans Paris Hilton)

By lyzpfister

Today it is raining. Sheets of fine mist slant through my gray Brooklyn sky and I watch it comfortably curled in my desk chair, writing poetry, drinking coffee, reading Buglakov’s The Master and Margarita, where Satan has just finished throwing a rager. I light candles and take a bath, paint my toenails, watch Jesus Christ Superstar, write more poetry, listen to rain dribble against my air conditioning unit with metallic thwacks.

When I wake up this morning, I find this comment from my mother on my facebook status: I didn’t want to get out of bed this morning. All I could think was how the cold has reduced my world to a very small space, and all I do in that space is eat.

Of course, she has no way of knowing that it will be cold in Brooklyn again, that it will rain in Brooklyn, that I, too, won’t want to leave my space – or my space heater. But I consider it good advice, and I eat.

In the cold, on this day, I want nothing complex. I don’t want to cook. I want toast – and then to stick my hands in the toaster after I pull my bread out. I want salty sardines in olive oil and avocado. Sicilian black pepper cheese. Salt. Pepper. And then I want to go back to my desk, surrounded by candles and light, read about the devil, and listen to rain.

February 21, 2010

Tailgating at 9am (a post by Josh)

By johamlet

From my limited understanding about tailgating, what you do at a tailgate is stand around the back of a truck, grill, drink, and stand in a parking lot. How American. That’s not what I ended up doing at nine am yesterday, but I did tailgate. What? Stop confusing me.

February 20, 2010

Ingredient: A Quick Shout-Out to Semolina

By lyzpfister

A few months ago, when I was about to move to New York, I decided to clean out my parents’ pantry of all the things that had been sitting on the shelves for years (not hyperbole) and would most likely be doomed to sit there for many more. I snatched some canned jellies, pickles, pastes, pates, spices, curds, and pastas, knowing they would never be missed. I’ve been slowly working my way through my parents’ pantry here in Brooklyn, and I’m often grateful for that swiped can of anchovies (sorry, mom, I know you would have probably used those) or am inspired by a bag of chocolate pasta I wouldn’t have gone out of my way to buy. Sometimes the food has been sitting around so long it’s already stale – I’ve eaten some disappointing packets of oatmeal, slurped stale Ramen soup, and given away old-tasting pretzels to my less discerning roommates. But so far, the best find from the pantry has been semolina flour.

I had never eaten semolina flour before yesterday. My roommate and I had gone to a kegger in Williamsburg with free Kombucha and free Sixpoint beer, and by the time we left we were feeling hungry and tired after long days. In the mood for a movie and comfort food. I remembered a recipe from last month’s Bon Appétit that I had wanted to try – deep fried eggs with sriracha remoulade, which sounded like the bastion of comfort food: warm, soft-boiled eggs, mayonnaise, spice, pickles, and fried goodness. So I picked up a six-pack of Sierra Nevada at the corner Bodega and made small talk with the owner, who was feeling glum about spending his Friday night stuck under fluorescent lights.

Back at the apartment, I found my neighbor on the couch and told her she was going to have to stay for deep fried eggs even though she had work to do. So we put on Whitney Houston’s “I Wanna Dace With Somebody,” which is perfect comfort food-making music, and set about whipping up a remoulade and boiling eggs.

I’ve almost forgotten that I’m supposed to be telling you about how great semolina is. Here’s where it figures in this story: our soft boiled eggs were first rolled in a mixture of white flour and semolina flour, dunked in a blend of buttermilk, egg, and sriracha, and then covered with panko and salt.

Almost everything I’ve ever tried to deep fry has ended up tasting embarrassing, but last night it was as if deep-fry gods had smiled upon the Whitney and the Sierra Nevada and the good company. The eggs were perfect – light brown, crunchy fried crust, which, when cracked open hissed out steam and molten yolk.

Comfort food brought to you by semolina (and eggs and sriracha and mayonnaise and fried goodness). But anyway – that’s not how I really discovered the goodness of semolina. That’s just why I happened to open the bag.

Today, as I was cleaning up the kitchen, something which clearly didn’t happen last night, I saw a recipe on the back of the semolina for breakfast porridge, which involved emptying the whole pack in two liters of boiling water. Not so practical. But, using my cook’s intuition, I figured the standard two parts water to one part grain ratio would work relatively well. So as I made my morning cappuccino, I set a pot of water to boil, and when it was bubbling, added the semolina flour. Which, contrary to the instructions on the package (five minutes), cooked in about five seconds. The ratio was a little off – semolina requires about an extra ¼ – ½ cup of water, but I managed to smooth out most of the lumps. The result, plus milk, butter, and brown sugar, was a creamy, sweet porridge that was truly comforting to eat. Sort of like a cream of wheat that tastes more of mornings in the country and less of old people.

And to wrap up the whole semolina story, for lunch I threw the leftover cooked semolina (I couldn’t eat it all in porridge), in a skillet with green onions and mushrooms, and topped it with a fried egg and shavings of grated Sicilian black pepper cheese. Delicious.

So semolina, the grain I tried for the first time yesterday, has featured in my last three meals in three very different ways. From creamy to crunchy, to crisped – this versatile staple might just be my new comfort food.


The History of the Croquette

Trying to nail down the history of croquettes is quite difficult.

The modern version is that the father of modern French cuisine, Auguste Escoffier, together with Philias Gilbert wrote down the first recipe in 1798.

In the 1600’s Sephardi Jews developed a similar method with poultry and leftover breadcrumbs.

There is a croquette version in every major culinary region in the World

Some of the most notables include India with a potato filled croquette called Aloo Tikki.

Indonesia has the Kroket. A meat-filled mashed potato ball that is breaded and deep fried.

Japan developed the Korokke. A potato and vegetable croquette.

South Korea has the Goroke.

Germany and Austria has Kroketten. A potato croquette.

Ireland has Boxty. A cross between mashed potatoes and hash browns leavened with baking powder.

Russia developed the kotleta rublennaya. A minced meat croquette made of bread, eggs, salt and spices.

Cuba and Puerto Rico have a ham or chicken version of croquettes.

Various versions and names in the United States include fish cakes, crab cakes, hushpuppies, salmon croquettes.


Recipe Summary

  • ½ cup mayonnaise
  • 1 tablespoon ketchup
  • 2 tablespoons cream-style horseradish sauce
  • ⅓ teaspoon paprika
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ⅛ teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1 pinch ground black pepper
  • ⅓ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 ½ teaspoons salt
  • 1 ½ teaspoons cayenne pepper
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • ½ teaspoon ground black pepper
  • ⅓ teaspoon dried oregano
  • ⅛ teaspoon dried thyme
  • ⅛ teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 large sweet onion
  • ¾ cup vegetable oil for frying

To make sauce: In a medium bowl, combine mayonnaise, ketchup, horseradish, 1/3 teaspoon paprika, 1/4 teaspoon salt, 1/8 teaspoon oregano, a dash ground black pepper and cayenne pepper mix well. Keep sauce covered in refrigerator until needed.

To make the batter: In a medium bowl, beat egg and add milk. In a separate bowl, combine flour, salt, cayenne pepper, paprika, ground black pepper, oregano, thyme and cumin mix.

To slice onion: slice 1 inch off of the top and bottom of the onion and remove the papery skin. Use a thin knife to cut a 1 inch diameter core out of the middle of the onion. Now use a very sharp, large knife to slice the onion several times down the center to create 'petals': First slice through the center of the onion to about three-fourths of the way down. Turn the onion 90 degrees and slice it again in an X across the first slice. Keep slicing the sections in half, very carefully until the onion has been cut 16 times. Do not cut down to the bottom of the onion. (The last 8 slices will be difficult, be careful).

Spread the 'petals' of the onion apart. To help keep them separate you could plunge the onion into boiling water for 1 minute and then into cold water.

Dip the onion into the milk mixture and then coat it liberally with the flour mixture. Again separate the petals and sprinkle the dry coating between them. Once you're sure the onion is well-coated, dip it back into the wet mixture and into the dry coating again. This double-dipping ensures you have a well-coated onion because some of the coating will wash off when you fry the onion.

Heat oil in a deep fryer or deep pot to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Make sure you use enough oil to completely cover the onion when it fries.

Fry the onion right side up in the oil for 10 minutes or until it turns brown. When the onion has browned, remove it from the oil and let it drain on a rack or paper towels. Open the onion wider from the center so that you can put a small dish of the dipping sauce in the center.


Tuscan Pork Chops with Marsala and Parmesan Polenta

Oh the weather outside is frightful, but this dish is so delightful. . . I’m listening to the wind howl outside which is why I’m up at 6:00 a.m. thinking of warm and wonderful things for you to make. Just thinking about this recipe makes me warm. Just thinking about you, my family and friends makes me warm – oh wait, no, it’s just another hot flash!

There are a lot of ingredients in this but it’s really a complete meal. All on one plate you have protein, vegetable, starch and cheese. Cheese is a food group right? You might want to add a simple green salad to round out the meal.

Tuscan Pork Chops with Marsala and Parmesan Polenta

Chops:
1 tbs. chopped fresh rosemary
1 tbs. chopped fresh thyme
1/4 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. freshly ground pepper
3 1/2 tbs. olive oil, divided
4 bone in pork loin chops
Vegetables:
12 small pearl onions, peeled, left whole
12 whole garlic cloves
10 crimini or button mushrooms cut into quarters
1/2 cup Marsala wine (Port or Madeira wine can be substitued)
1/2 cup chicken broth
2 cups cherry tomatoes
1/2 pound fresh baby spinach
salt and pepper
1 tbs. chopped Italian parsley
Polenta:
3 cups milk
3/4 cup polenta or cornmeal
3/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Preheat oven to 350.
Stir together the rosemary, thyme, salt, pepper and 1 1/2 tbs. olive oil. Rub this mixture onto the pork chops. Set aside.
In a large ovenproof skillet, heat remaining 2 tbs. olive oil over medium heat. Saute the onions, garlic and mushrooms for 5 minutes until slightly softened. Remove and set aside. Brown the chops in the same pan 2-3 minutes a side. Return the onion mixture to the pan, place the pan in the oven and roast 15-20 minutes.

While the pork is in the oven, make the polenta. Heat the milk in a heavy saucepan until boiling. Add salt and pepper to taste. Pour in the cornmeal slowly while whisking constantly. Reduce heat to low and cook about 5 minutes until thickened. Remove from heat, stir in the cheese, cover and set aside.

When the pork is done, remove the chops and vegetables from the pan, cover and keep warm. Place the pan over medium heat and add the Marsala. Simmer until it reduces by half. Add the chicken broth and bring to a simmer. Add the tomatoes and spinach and cook about 3-5 minutes until spinach is tender. Season with salt and pepper.

To serve, spoon some polenta on individual plates. Top with a pork chop, some onion mixture and some tomato, spinach, wine sauce. Garnish with chopped Italian parsley. This also looks awesome in a big shallow serving dish, served family style.

Posted in meat | Tagged Tuscan Pork Chops | Leave a Comment »


Entrees

Aunt Bertha’s Fried Chicken

turkey stewed collard greens, mac & cheese 14 ** all fried chicken dinners are served with 2 sides and dark meat. feel free to request & enjoy an all-white meat plate for a $2 surcharge. **

Ace’s Fish And Grits

smoked gouda grits with crispy alaskan white fish filet

Mama Joyce’s House Salad

mixed field greens, tomatoes, onions, cucumbers, carrots and cheddar cheese Add: salmon 10, shrimp 9, grilled chicken 7

Side Selections

mac n’ cheese 4.95 | kandi’s sweet potato souffle 4.95 | cole slaw 4.95 | collard greens 4.95 | green beans 4.95 | side salad 5.95 french fries 4.95 | sautéed spinach 4.95 | smashed potatoes 4.95 | steamed cabbage 4.95 | rice with gravy 4.95 | cornbread 4pc. 3.99 | loaded smashed potatoes 5.95 | side salad 4.95 | rice 4.95 | black eyed peas 4.95 | black eyed peas with rice 5.95

OLG Cheeseburger Melt

6oz angus beef patty topped with melted American cheese, on a toasted texas toast with lettuce and tomato on the side, served with French fries (no substitutions)

Fish Dinner

alaskan white fish fried golden brown and served with collard greens and mac & cheese

Kandi’s Original Baked Chicken

served with rice and black eyed peas (limited availability) all white meat plate 2.00 additional

Kandi’s Honey Glazed Blackened Salmon

smashed potatoes and green beans

Grilled Lamb Chops

served with loaded smashed potatoes drizzled with OLG signature steak sauce

Grilled Shrimp Po Boy

grilled shrimp with remoulade, tomatoes, shredded lettuce and a side of fries

Riley’s Shrimp & Grits

smoked gouda grits, sautéed shrimp and vodka cream sauce

Mama Sharon’s Chicken & French Toast

french toast and whole breaded wings served with maple syrup and cream anglaise

Mama Joyce’s BBQ Rib Tips

served with smashed potatoes and green beans

KPT’s Fish and Chips

alaskan white fish fried golden brown served with crispy french fries and a side of coleslaw (no substitutions) Add: Texas Toast 2.00 additional


Watch the video: Greek Scrambled Eggs. Everyone will ask for the recipe! Quick, easy and delicious dish